Manufacturing Hand Sanitizer During COVID-19

By |July 7th, 2020|Uncategorized|

Manufacturing Hand Sanitizer During a Pandemic

The ability to manufacture hand sanitizer quickly and efficiently is paramount in light of the recent pandemic and COVID-19 outbreak. Millions of people worldwide are using hand sanitizing products at record high levels and demand remains strong. Manufacturers of basic hand sanitizer gels and sprays will want to produce larger quantities while new players are entering the landscape every day.

The most common and simplistic approach is the batch mix tank method. However, adding all your ingredients to a single, costly batch tank and agitating with any form of mechanical shear will NOT be the best way to make more product faster.

The instinct by many is to say, “Let’s throw it all in a tank and mix it, then pump it out to a hold tank.” But, I’m here to tell you, there is a better way….batch mixing!

We all need cleaner hands right now!

Manufacture Hand Sanitizer: Batch Mixing vs Inline Blending

To make more product faster, it’s best to capitalize on drawing from bulk and establish ingredient ratios inline using mass flow meter technology. This can be accomplished using a customized TechBlend multiple-feed inline blending skid that draws raw materials from bulk or totes and meters them at proper ratio to a hold tank near the filling line.

Inline Blending Pros:

  • Eliminates large and costly batch tanks
  • Reduce Fire Code issues by reducing volume of alcohol inside the factory
  • Eliminate multiple transfer times
  • Reduce labor involvement
  • Reduce weigh and transfer errors
  • Reduce factory floor space required
  • Make more product faster

Inline Blending Cons:

  • Personnel should be educated and trained
  • More planning required for precision and safety

Batch Mixing Pros:

  • Requires less sophisticated personnel
  • Requires less factory automation
  • Requires less planning. The downside in taking this approach is big though. A lot of floor space will be required to keep adding batch mixing tanks as the process grows. These large tanks are costly to say the least. Errors ensue from a labor intensive approach that involves transfers and weighing. Transfer times from bulk storage to tanks and from those tanks to filling hold tanks consumes a lot of time and energy. You’ll also have issues navigating fire codes as you’ll be placing large quantities of ethanol in large volume tanks inside the building

Batch Mixing Cons:

  • A lot of floor space will be required to keep adding batch mixing tanks as the process grows
  • These large tanks are costly (to say the least)
  • Errors ensue from a labor intensive approach that involves transfers and weighing
  • Transfer times from bulk storage to tanks and from those tanks to filling hold tanks consumes a lot of time and energy
  • You’ll have issues navigating fire codes as you’ll be placing large quantities of ethanol in large volume tanks inside the building

If you want to learn more about Sonic Corp

About the Author:

Rob Brakeman
Owner & Director